The Paul McCartney Project

Paul McCartney in Casual Conversation from LIPA

Jul 25th 2018

Album This interview has been made to promote the Egypt Station Official album.

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Interview

Jarvis Cocker: I’m just here basking in your presence. I suppose if I just sit here basking you might get bored after event so I’ll ask you some questions

Paul McCartney: go on  

Jarvis Cocker: it seems we’re here… In some way this was your old school. I mean you went to school here

Oh
[Music]
hi there my name is Jarvis very happy to
be here I think you’ve been told to turn
your phone’s off and all that business
haven’t you you won’t want to have your
phone on anyway because something very
exciting is going to happen I’m just
going to do a short bit of full
disclosure here I probably am not going
to be very professional as a questioner
today because I’m a massive fan of the
person who I’m going to be speaking to I
was remembered on the way over here when
I was supposed to be you know at school
and taking notice of things justify that
sometimes I would be a home I would
sometimes I would stay in the whole day
listening to the radio next to my radio
cassette player hoping that they would
play a Beatles song so I could record it
shouldn’t say that really are kind of
illegal but so my critical faculties are
all out of the window I’m very excited
as you might be able to tell
and I’d like you to welcome to the stage
none other than
[Applause]
[Music]
[Applause]
thank you
son just here basking in your presence I
suppose if I just sit here basking ya
might get bored after event so I’ll ask
you some questions gone it seems that
since we’re here in some way this was
your old school and then he went to
school here yeah so that must be kind of
a weird thing do you feel like
something’s gonna come and tell you off
in him Akane what are you doing here ya
know I’m the boss now ya know it really
does kind of freaks me out put in a nice
way whenever I come back here my first
time I never came in here was when I was
eleven and you went to if you’re lucky
went to the grammar school I went to
this one and we came in up there because
that was where the youngest kids were so
I remember kind of coming in universal
oh it was like thousand boys so and I’d
never been in a school that big or that
portion and so it was amazing for me
just seeing this whole structured way of
education that I had not been used to at
all I was impressed and because now this
is later this is a School for the
Performing Arts yeah
I wonder what it was like at that time
when you were here was like creativity
encouraged in the you know in the school
as it was there not really no in fact
the worst was music yeah
there was like no encouragement if I go
typical music lesson will be there’d be
about 30 boys in the class and the
teacher come in we don’t be there ready
for a music lesson teacher come in and
he’d have a little record player in the
middle of the room and he put a hell
peel and he’d she said I want you to
listen to this point and let me know
what you think of it he put it on and he
go out which is kinda fatal you know
he’s like aah

so we would post one guy on the door as
the lookout and then we get the ciggies
and the cards and everything and you
know let his record we probably took the
record off yeah and he come back look
how he’s got the smoke away then we look
Sid very studiously I said what did you
think of it Boyd was really good so when
I was it we never got any more than that
never even though dududududududududu I’m
sure none of that kind of behavior goes
on in this school
oh now you know it was it was exciting
the seika’s having a whole range of ages
from us little plebs you know to the
swat East prefect sand head boys
teachers and the headmaster who was
Junior Edwards who he was known as the
bass the bass the bass ba said okay mr.
pastor oh and he was the one who would
cane you because we’re talking all days
in ER I mean in fact this is before I
was here what the Charles Dickens stood
on this stage and lectured no pressure
not to pull you off but so it was it was
like you know the Dark Angel but it was
you know you’re left-handed did you get
any stick for that like it’s cool out
cuz I’m them and my mom telling me
stories about we would to say oh you
can’t walk right with your left hand
mmm and actually conscious you get
forces to not me but my mum got a lot of
stick about oh yeah I don’t know did you
know it wasn’t too bad
well I do have a distant memory of
sitting down to write with my left hand
and writing my name backwards right in P
but going that way instead of going that
way mirror writing what does this say
about him so you know so but they never
told me if I was allowed to write left
see say you weren’t really getting music
education at school so what do you
consider the things that didn’t teach
you about music where did you get that
info from and my dad was a good amateur
pianist and he was the guy at the family
parties who would play the piano and
they rolled had brought back and all the
ladies would sit around the room with
little drinks because if you have little
drinks you don’t get drunk unless you
have a lot of little place this is what
they did they never looked like a picnic
but they would then sing all the all the
old songs of the time of their time so
this all went in so I I kind of still
know those old songs and he would play
the piano and I think all of that kind
of ended up just reading kind of thing
on but and when he later he couldn’t
play the piano he got arthritis so I
ended up was the guy who played all
these old songs when the very problems
you know well I mean that I think that’s
one way I learn music and then the other
thing was that he’d given me a trumpet
for my birthday and I kind of learned
because he used to be a drummer play
tennis this is a laminar band and this
was in the 20s when he was in the band
so it’s all Borneo don’t talk to a tough
time still BC in the films you know but
he didn’t want to teach me he thought I
should learn properly and so I tried a
few times to learn properly I but hated
it when he probably talked about having
to learn how to read music and read
music and scales are really important
yes this is what I mean to say too by
the way hello world were on Facebook
[Applause]

folks yeah no don’t let us put you off
learning music is a really great thing
now but the the sort of guitar craze
came along it was it’s given it’s like a
folk thing and we all were very into it
so a lot of people got guitar so I asked
my dad if I could trade the trumpet in
for a guitar which having been a
musician he it was fine with so then I
had a guitar and you you met lots of
friends who had guitars he would just
talk so it’s where I met George who went
to this cool George Harrison I met it me
used to get on the bus
the stop after I did I was about a half
an hour ride into this school so if we
ever sat next to each other we were just
develop our friendship and started
talking about guitars so then we learned
chords off each other and the great
thing was and then same happen with John
the great thing was that years later if
John and I was showing the guy’s a song
George automatically knew anything we
knew
you know it wasn’t like we knew anything
more he knew exactly so we could just go
Jimmy G to play through and he would
know the song you know so but I think
that’s really where our music took off
once we had this and of course it was a
craze rock and roll actually was coming
in you know from skinful it and I
remember you mean these used to be pews
not these nice comfortable seats you’re
all sitting in we had Borden benches you
know and I remember sitting back there
with a copy of a music paper the enemy
and seeing a picture of Elvis Presley
you know we just enthralled with this
guy and then when we heard his records
that was it so we wanted to do that we
want it to be like that that was how we
wanted to live that’s interested sit
would would you say that you saw Elvis
before you heard in that hmm it’s quite
interesting so that must have been kind
of a bit mind-blowing to imagine what it
might be like and then to actually hear
it was an ad for Heartbreak Hotel his
first records and yeah we just we just
fell for the whole thing you know we
just thought he was a great singer he
had a great sense of humor he made great
records
and we just we just that was it then so
we got into a group John was already in
a group so but it was kind of you know
you learned everything just by a year
and we never learned to write anything
down well this wasn’t I wanted to ask
you about how you remembered songs
because if tape recorders were around
they must have been really bulky mm-hmm
it’s not like today where if you kind of
have an idea and you’re out somewhere
you can like hum it into your phone like
that so how did you kind of remember I
always think that was a great thing that
we didn’t have and we did thank you say
the big bulky one was called Grundig a
little blinking green eye in the front
but we never had one we knew a guy who
did so we borrowed it once and we put a
couple of little songs down on it but we
mainly used it for prank phone calls
explain your gonna have to explain okay
here’s how it went a fear John just in
my house in Portland Road and we’ve got
this thing so we we some think I know we
should do we should record a bit of
dialogue and then leave applause and
they’d say a little bit more leaving
pauses and will ring up someone and then
we record the whole thing you know so if
we ended up ringing his one of his
school teachers call mr. popjoy
good name so the dialogue went like this
year we put on voices hello there’s
almost a pod pod joint here we’ve I’m
ringing about the bananas I don’t know
yes the bananas you ordered so we didn’t
join sir your question we didn’t really
do much recording you know but the thing
is why it was a good thing was that we
had to write songs you could remember
and I think that turned out to be a good
thing so you know John and I would have
a writing session and we write something
go away I was normally the afternoon so
they would go away we have any evening
out and stuff and in the middle of the
evening you think but it always came
back in the morning first thing in the
morning oh yeah oh you play it again and
you just remembered it and we and we
ended up saying well if we can’t
remember it how to expect other people
to so I suppose you were right and stuff
that was memorable and I hate to say
we’re still remembering it now you know
that’s very true
all they always
Jesus I used to do a radio show and one
feature that was a thing called on this
day did you go like that I had to do in
the voice on this yeah I found out two
things on this day from your life the
first one is the 25th of July 1963
you played the fourth of six nights at
Hammersmith at Weston super Mare Odeon I
don’t expect you to remember that but I
just wonder had you do something wrong
to be sentenced to be playing Wessex
nice
seems a lot long time to be playing
Western Superman
we could fill it though now I really
think it was just because you know I
don’t know we just we did what the
manager told us you’re playing
weston-super-mare
and of course cause it’s a seaside as we
loved it went on the beach got prawn
tease
oh you know it wasn’t too much the plane
that was just what we did in the evening
but it was good fun and there was
another one it’s not quite the right day
but in a couple of days in 1968 you went
into the studio and recorded Hey Jude
and then the session went from 8:30 p.m.
till 4:00 a.m. the reason I mention that
is just as well as we’re here I wonder
if that gives any insight into that you
know the recording process how do you
capture a song you know when do you
decide you’ve said this thing about you
know you yeah but you if it sticks with
you then you know it’s worth having then
I guess the next decision is when do you
try and capture it try and get it down
on tape how do you make those decisions
you know well I think when when the
songs done you you go boy what happened
with me with albums is I just write
songs till I got too many and I think
what I better record them so I can write
another book
so yeah you wait till you’ve got the
song
finished and I’ve written Hey Jude I
checked it out played it to John and he
liked it there was one line in it that I
thought I was going to change remember
him I’m offering my little music room at
the top of the house on this little
magic piano I had and I’m playing the
song and I go the movement you need is
on your shoulder and I said honestly
I’ll be changing that don’t worry he
looks good so you won’t you know the
best lying minutes so you know that that
was like so each signed off on it so we
went to a Pierrot wasn’t available but
we wanted to know that it was ready to
record once in sort of getting someone
so we went to a place called Trident
which was in Soho and little studio we
used to use and we just sort of went in
probably like you say in the evening we
always used to work only a day on during
the day because that was the way you
were supposed to but as we got more and
more successful as time went on we’d
heard that people like Frank Sinatra
worked through the night so he’s a
relapse all of that so that would game
became another cool thing to do
so we came in and we’d kind of you know
I’d but I play it through so everyone
knew it and you start recording it and I
think easily you know with memories
particularly quite a long time you get
little stories that you tell and then
I’m always back on my mind to go and is
this true you’re making this up but I
remember you know I think sitting down
and doing hate you told me and then just
realizing Ringo had gone to the toilet
but he’s got his drunkard over there and
eat crap he gone today
so hey
turn unluckily you didn’t come in for a
couple of verses and then he’s got to
come in I just see him at the corner of
my own thinking this is quite a good
take I’m singing this well well I think
we’re just going to say that is true
discuss offense
I like we’re going to ask some questions
from people absenting questions I know
those questions from people who were
here in the audience people who are
studying here at letter also some
questions that have come from Facebook
look could I start with one question
which kind of is almost related to that
which comes from my friend Richard
hauling a musician from Sheffield
nevermind that was that their wit and he
was wandering him as a little never mind
as long as you’ve got your health he
managed to drink oh then and he wanted
to know what Custer was a craze around
that time when you started of people
having pseudonyms like Billy Fury and
all stuff like that and Ringo Starr
mm-hmm did any of the rest of you think
of having some kind of like superheroes
pseudonym yeah this is what you thought
you had to do yeah you know Paul
McCartney it’s like it sounds good now
that’s alright now I must I’ve grown
into it put a lot of work into yeah
but ya know we did think we had to be
more glamorous so I was Paul Rummel nice
little sound and we went on a little
tour with a guy called Johnny gentle we
were because yeah this is a thing all
the other people were like Billy Fury
Danny turn boost morale wild and we’ve
got landed with Johnny gentle alright
playing and we’re backing him up in
there and and you get you go up there
and to be all the little because it’s
gotten me little Scottish fans they go
to George watch Carl Harrison and John
it was Long John Silver and but wrinkl
came with the name and everything you
know why because he was we always kind
of he was the oldest in the group but
you know also to us like the
professional and we were kind of
amateurs we sort of students I was I
think one of the nice things about the
Beatles
we weren’t really serious about Yogi’s
just sort of dragged into it you have to
be in it to play but Ringo had his group
using Rory storm and the Hurricanes and
another pseudonym Rory Caldwell
anyway so he was within that band and
they were like we thought they were like
really pros because they had a season at
portland’s which is a hard to come for
any of you global listeners and that was
a great gig you’ve got to go there you
got to settle in you’ve got your rooms
you got the girls I knew would the big
rock stars you know so Ringo became
Ringo Starr with lots of rings for that
you know but he was the only one but
yeah we changed you know poor Roma it’s
good
I might go back to it and that’s not a
look really we are that maybe this is
slightly related this is a someone who
should be in the audience Steven Geisler
hope I’m pronouncing that correctly
Steven guys well Giesler are you here
you can just say present sir yeah
Stevens question is if music hadn’t
worked out what are the career could you
seen yourself do it well you know at
that time in this school you would go to
the careers master I don’t know if it
still happens you know as he leaving you
sort of school to go out into the big
world and I went in this guy and he’s
talking to me what you liked it and he
turned out I only had enough
qualifications to be a teacher you know
it’s like you’re no good or you can be a
teacher won’t teach other people not to
be good you’ve got a knack so that what
I was I adapt you to go and be yeah but
you’re you’re breaking that kind of
thing
within this Academy oh yeah yeah we
don’t do that anymore
no much groovier now is one is there a
Brian Campbell in the audience oh right
Brian’s question is is there a song you
are jealous of and wish that you were
driven and it’s so one or what is it
yeah there’s always a couple that I hear
you know that I think are nice and I
would like to I liked stings field of
gold and I thought you know what I
should have read that how dare he did
you let me know that yeah yeah you stole
my soul
and I that was a nice one you know let’s
have another one here some of these are
very long and the favori won’t get a
chance to go through all of them you’re
whipping through them there I’ve got
them here but he’s gone gone out of
order so I’m totally I’m on Georgia rim
I don’t know if I’m on number 10
Thomas Whitaker you’ve really built it
alright Thomas would like to know what
was the last piece of music or album you
listen to that you found quite
impressive all as stuck with it I think
probably Kendrick Lamar yeah and I liked
sorry I mean you know talking about
modern so so the last piece of music
Muslim people and not so modern
I like Kanye’s dark twisted fantasy like
that’s why I ended up working with him
cuz I like that other pieces I don’t
know there’s one out at the moment that
I think is very catchy which is
Christine and the Queen’s
record I like that it is like totally
Michael Jackson rip off well we don’t
mind and now did hear music now because
he was a so many different ways with
these I know we never – but I’m talking
about what because there are so many I
suppose industry speak would be delivery
platforms all but there’s so many ways
you could I love it when you talk dirty
[Music]
what say that really but yeah I mean you
know as I don’t know if you could hear
before you took the stage I was saying I
used to stay at home just listen to the
radio hoping a Beatles song would come
on and record it if we did I’m sorry
about that not I play the Royal we’re
suing on you but you know now there are
many of the ways that kids saw anybody
you know to hear music so how do you me
it’s mainly radio probably in the car
yes you know in any journey I’ll just
listen see what you hear
I still have CDs come on and and I
listened to buy them and then I just
Spotify mmm-hmm calm before so you know
quite a few ways I still play vinyl yeah
well it leads me understanding I wanted
to talk to you about actually because I
was reading stuff he was saying about
you new record Egypt station and and one
of the things you said about it was that
you want it he wanted to make an album
that was like an album and you
remembered albums are mm-hm which for me
when I think of that I think of a vinyl
album I thinking that that’s in a way
recorded music found its ideal home you
know the length of them of an album the
fact it’s got two sides and stuff I
don’t know what was that what you meant
by that
yeah I mean what I thought was these
days you’ve got you know the big stars
like people saying Taylor Swift and
Kendrick and the people know more
particularly the first two and their
songs are in a way a collection of
singles you know they’re all great
commercial tracks but it doesn’t kind of
roll through like a Pink Floyd album
used to or Vietnam and I so I thought
well I can’t compete with that kind of
Taylor Swift thing she’s got better legs
than me
fortunately you’re handling you I know
that we know these but so you know I
thought with maybe what I can do you
just do a sort of what used to be called
a concept album so it’s it is an album
that if you want to can sort of listen
all the way and it should roll through
and take you someone that’s what I told
was this new one um so the cover is part
of is that I was gonna ask you about the
title of the album but I believe that’s
the name of the painting that’s on the
on the cover yeah
yeah I did a painting and it had
Egyptian iconography in it because I do
I like that kind of thing so I put some
of these images in the baking and mixed
it up a bit and just to remember it I
call the Egypt station because you had
sort of Egyptian things and I never
thought any more of a people quite liked
it so I liked that one you know and I
was looking at it one day and I thought
it’s quite a nice title that Egypt
station so that could be the new album’s
title and then I thought you know what
the painting could be the cover so we
started that’s where it started and then
we got some really good art directors
who took it but yeah that’s cool and so
you know we start off like with a
station noise so he was sort of in a
station and then acquire swells out of
that so it’s like heavenly station now
you’re tripping dude and then he goes
into the first song being on anything
carries on yeah and then and I shouldn’t
work am I allowed to I’m not gonna spoil
it but then at the end you was we go to
the station again don’t we go to the
station
yeah we did so you know that that’s that
was the idea we should do something like
like that for people who like that kind
of album that goes right through the
music
only gonna choose the single that they
like only going to choose that track in
that track but there will be those
amongst us who will listen all the ways
yeah and I think as we were saying about
I think an album is the format for that
I mean I I do that I don’t know whether
I’m representative of any demographic or
even human being but I enjoy that as a
thing to do to sit on the sexy foot of
an album on and just it’s a nice amount
of time 2025 minutes and you go into
that world for Amit and then you kind of
resurface make yourself a cup of tea put
the other side on if you want or or
whatever it’s a ya know there’s a really
pleasant way to absorb some music I
think yeah well so that’s the idea with
the new album yeah now here’s another
one this is kind of well this may be
this is slightly related number eleven
Carter Fleming are you are you present
hello Carter Carter would like to know
have the developments in technology for
recording in composing music affected
your writing process in any way kind of
ties into what we’re talking yeah I
think I think it has actually and I
think it’s maybe affected it adversely
because you could record anything any
time just reach your phone
bang you got it so I find myself with
like thousands of sketches doctor that
will do yeah he’s like I’ll finish that
one day so I’ve got thousands of things
to finish and I don’t think that’s a
great thing when you didn’t have that
you tended to have to finish it so the
process that John and I used just kind
of still how are you still the one I use
and it was just basically to sit down
come up with a bit of an idea of a song
and finish it just keep doing it keep
doing it until you got to the end and
then you’d written a song which I think
was
probably good rather than having a
little fragment a little sketch that
maybe months later you’ll return to and
you’ll be trying to recapture the vibe
that you did listening to it and so I
don’t think it’s as good a system and
that that I would say I’m complaining
about that just keys to easy to pour
ideas down and and then just not bother
and does that also go through to this
studio as well because obviously now you
can like record everything and then you
can if if a bit goes wrong you can edit
that bit out and mmm let’s combine take
one with yeah six thousand and then
auto-tune it so it’s all same key oh
you’ve seen me record oh I know that
table I wonder with this record it
doesn’t sound like it was done that way
so I wonder whether we know what was
your method well you know I think it is
a really good strong thing if you can
get the original performance with your
band or however down all-in-one so
you’ve got the kind of spirit of it and
so quite a few tracks on the album we
just did with the band you know we
learned them and do them like old school
and then we may be over toward maybe did
this and that you know but there is
something comes through it’s the
spontaneity and why I remembered that I
must do that but listening to all Beatle
records yeah I can hear them this also
got fresh there right in your face yeah
particularly the realer he was and and I
think it was just its spirit got onto
the record you know but we didn’t mess
around
oh yeah we’re talking all about you know
how we recorded we first came down from
all got our first recording contract
with Sir George Martin blessing and we
were told what they wanted us to do
because they were grownups and we were
twenty something
and we didn’t know and no idea what you
did in her call this year so they just
said show a 10 o’clock and between 10:00
and 10:30 get ready
you’d have tune up and obviously he’s
covered to you whatever we want to do
and then at 10:30 the producer will come
again and you’ll start the session and
from there you had one and a half hours
to finish that song completely which we
never thought it was a pressure because
we didn’t know anything else and they
just sort of said you know George just
so George Martin would come down and me
and John afternoon was unless it was
George’s song but it was after me and
John would have written the song the
week before and because our manager ring
goes up and say you’ve got a week off we
got wow great
he said to write the next album we’ve
got great I mean it seemed like enough
time you know so we did it and we bring
it in on the Monday morning and it was
only me and John knew it so we had a
couple of acoustic guitars so we just
singing do-do-do-do-do – whatever George
and Ringo would would watch it George
o’clock the chords Ringo it so yeah it’s
the beat and then we just separate I go
on bass John and georgia vonnegut aren’t
ringing on drums and we would just start
recording so that would keep us about
we’re probably at about an hour and 10
left to do this record and now because
that was the only time you had you did
it and then you had to do another song
in the morning they did an hour off it
was like 10:30 to do the maths 10:30
plus one and a half hours wellness
school
I don’t say everyone subject yeah
amongst the many anybody then you’d have
a fun warm
you know from 12 you’d have to 130 he
had a break of an hour you came back and
you did it all again two more songs and
so you were knocked off by five ish and
you’d what four songs in the camp which
you know right today standards is like
silly what that musics a deal I’ve got
the snare sound by that just about which
the computer on yeah yeah no it’s true
yeah so it was a great system and most
of all the early Beatles records were
done like that and what I liked about it
was after you’d finished you’d put in
this hard day you had four songs so you
were kind of priorities then you could
go out in the evening you’d have
something to eat or maybe go to a play
or something
and I think that informed the next day
yeah you know because we’re down in
London so I might go to like the
National Theatre and see a play I was
going out with an actress at the time so
we’d go out and see Juno and the paycock
gonna call and Blakely in it and it was
so good you know Nationals do you don’t
why did you come back you don yeah and I
don’t know it’s somehow informed what
you did the next day raised the bar a
little bit so I was always glad that we
had those hard working days but the
evenings off yeah the way you speak
speak about it I wonder do you ever come
here and like have you ever taken a
class here or anything like that you
know yeah are you saying about the thing
of people getting something down quick
oh yeah I haven’t done sort of a
recording thing I do the song writers so
I come up here and I basically listening
to a bunch of songwriting students who
are kind of my students you know and I
always say to them okay look you know I
don’t know how to do this I know which
is great
look yeah oh yeah great teacher see ya I
was always destined but no I mean is I
actually don’t know how to do it and I
don’t want to know how to do it I sit
down to write a song I hope it’s
something I don’t know how to do and I
hope it’s noon you know I don’t want to
think always got to do got to do this
you know I find myself getting
predictable I’ll try break I think so
say that to them and and then after the
shocks come off their faces they will
then play me a song they play me their
work and I’m just kind of critique and
I’ll say I’m just imagined we’re writing
together and what I would do would be
this and by the way you don’t have to
accept it because it’s your song oh my
but generally you know they accept
now you know I mean hopefully I made
good situations
know that I mean I think that’s really
interesting because as you say this is
an academy and it’s it’s to some extent
a formal education and that’s not
something that you had in your in your
music education and then it’s interested
here that you you know communicate that
because I agree with you I think music
it’s a very kind of slippery beast to
how you tell whether something is good
or not is really like wonder I don’t
know whether you get this thing but like
one day you can write a song you think
yes
Grammy’s come on and then you listen to
the next signal oh my god good trap yeah
and I know that thing can work the other
way like you right so do you think it’s
children rubbish and then and then
listen to the next day and you realize
it’s good so that kind of thing where
you can never pin it down in some ways
is frustrating but also is what’s
exciting about it because you never tame
it anyway that’s why me you know that’s
why I don’t really want to tame it or
know how it goes you know and the thing
is we learn it by doing it the way we
happen to do it or having to have done
it I’m not saying the Beatles all the
Liverpool groups all the British groups
the British Invasion for America I don’t
know any of them really knew how to
write or read music we didn’t need to
and we’re talking to Jeff Lynn about it
well we just made you look didn’t we you
know enjoy that’s what we do we just
sort of made it up but I I will work
with people who do know how to do
furnaces something’s got to be
orchestrated I will bring in someone who
actually knows what to tell the
orchestra you know I’d have to write it
out but often they will say to me oh
that song was that three four two four
twin of the part I know
because we you know we made it up so we
just go closer to you know good day
sunshine I have the bad and there’s
somewhere in there’s a 2/4 bar or
something you know but we just went oh
it went like that yeah change is there
yeah and I think it was more exciting
yeah a minute it’s it’s written for me
not for of course you all you kids
around the world studying music and your
parents spending all that money no I
mean I you know it is also great to go
to the other route it’s just not the
route I went yeah well it’s funny you’ve
reminded me of something now because one
of the most frustrating things of my
adolescence was buying the Beatles song
book because I was such a family knows
Hannah and sitting down and then
suddenly having this terrible crushing
realization that I couldn’t play any of
the songs because they had all these
kind of thoughts that were like all over
it like that and I wondered about that
weather I bet they didn’t consult you
about those song book so or did they did
they come and say how do you play this
song no no I mean the chord symbols was
all we could ever read on sheet music
and the words so that’s what we used we
would just look up the chord symbol and
we knew a lot of the chords you know as
we because the thing about the reels we
started here in Liverpool and played
little clubs then we went to Hamburg I’m
going to Hamburg was like a big
experience not just for young kids let
off the leash in the Strip District oh
that was also revealing but just that we
played so long we played like sometimes
eight hours straight through kind of
thing you know
[Music]
but because we played so much you land
lots of stuff we learn lots of song
school you didn’t want to get bored and
you know at that age the worst thing is
your God we’re doing these same ten
songs again so we have millions of songs
and millions of chords so that’s what
happened we sort of developed just along
the way by learning chords I mean the
used to be a shop where we got our
guitars here called Hasse’s it owned by
a guy called Frank Heskey and in there
there was like the guy who could play
the guitar you know in the music shop he
was our being here on Jim Gretta and he
would he would play it was a Jazza
so he would sometimes play he’s amazing
cause I remember me and George just
studying it God why is that
oh yeah he’s like an F chord but he got
these funny little things going on here
oh yeah okay and we learned it I mean I
still dunno was called it an F demented
or something
but we learned it so that it suddenly
roundabouts that you hear it on quite a
few of our songs it’s in Michelle did
you do yeah I mean to lose you
yeah we just used and but that was a
thing you know and and it is it is funny
because I remember you know talking with
loads of groups and the kind of people
we’d hang out with be windy doing shows
and things of TV shows and I remember
sitting around with Travis and the guys
from Travis and we’re just chatting and
he were playing me one of those songs
and he sort of was in a and then it went
to F sharp minor so I said I like that
f-sharp minor and it was that what it’s
called
he says we call it one up from F Alden
it is well that’s it as long as
everybody in the band calls it that then
you’re alright exactly it’s so have
another question here this is number 12
John Reynolds white John John Reynolds
would like to know out of all the
musicians you’ve worked with who do you
admire the most and why out of all the
ones I’ve worked with it would be fellow
Beatles it would be John who was pretty
cool and George and Ringo you know
having worked with John so one on one
you know I I could see it I got to see
his Bruns before the world did so you
know I would get to hear across the
universe and Julia and some of these
songs you know and so you know I’m a big
fan and when we would work together on
something like day-in-the-life
he after what would happen is whoever
was going to be the sort of creator of
this song would bring in the first verse
so he said you knew what was going on
read the news today oh boy okay and then
we sit down and we take it from there
which the write it all down and develop
it and do the thing so yeah so I’ve seen
John at work you know so obviously and
little things he did were I thought
brilliant you know I I started a song
it’s getting better all the time and he
went he couldn’t get much worse
go get that down so you know just those
little things were you’d I think I think
and then I think Stevie Wonder you gotta
go to Stevie come please just the
musical monster you know he’s fantastic
everything only because he’s got
something was going on about Stevie
Wonder to me the other day like you know
he’s got his he’s even got two voices
he’s got like the hive Stevie and then
he’s got the angry Stevie and then then
he can play the harmonica and then
somebody showed me this clip the other
day where he just plays the drums
amazing his voice it’s like way too much
yeah you know he is and the little
guitar thing he’s got now obviously what
you know I worked with him we did the
record ebony and ivory which some people
thought was a big glib you know but to
me I thought it’s kind of cool thing you
know the black and white living together
in harmony what’s wrong with that but it
was it was great fun working with Stevie
on there he we came out to Montserrat
which was George Martin studio in the
Caribbean and so we were working there
and Linda my first wife Linda I said
well invite Stevie over oh it was a
Sunday we were taking the day off so I
said great so the hasty over angry mob
Steve do you fancy coming to lunch
oh yeah
so I said great I think to not do great
so totally to Oklahoma she’s okay so she
starts cooking with to look in mind so
three o’clock comes I go hey Steve how
you doing man
what’s going on you know oh oh oh yeah I
said you’re coming over with you oh yeah
yeah yeah I’m just heading out the door
yeah I’ll be there in two seconds well
10 o’clock at night I’m serious and that
felt like going behind you
but he just each out of rollerblades and
it was okay because did he have a good
excuse or – no hey you know what you
didn’t need one that’s the thing about
Steve you just you just gotta go with it
he’s just so good and you can’t say you
know but dinner was somewhat burned I’ve
got one here number 13 David Harrison
this question actually this is also my
mom asked this question as well
mm-hmm so it must be brilliant
it must be what’s your favorite cover
version of a Beatles song because I
think I think the Beatles do hold the
record for the most covered band ever so
there’s a lot of cover versions out
there on this so yeah there’s only
caught urea yeah
the wonder earliest one that really
caught my ear was pastor Phillips as a
kind of R&B; singer and she did a female
version of and I love called and I love
him which is really great
I love it and then later Ray Charles –
then I’m not Eleanor Rigby which was
loved
I mean he’s saying you know yeah our
stuffs being covered and I was lucky
when I come up with it on yesterday
because that covered like about 3,000
times
I think 3,000 people maybe over there
had recorded that and I was always
amazed great but I thought who are these
people you know so I said to one of our
guys I said Johnny can you get me like
the top ten just give me the sort of top
ten best ones I just saw and I listened
to a mother well they were great it was
like Frank Sinatra and Elvis Marvin Gaye
very cool Ray Charles and you know the
list went on it was amazing people
amazing versions it’s a funny thing
though when I listened through
it was Frank Elvis and I think Marvin
who changed the lyrics a little bit in
the middle I go why she had to go I
don’t know she wouldn’t say but they
changed why she had to go I don’t know
she wouldn’t notice I why she had to go
I don’t know she wouldn’t say I did
something wrong because what I think and
they go I must have done something wrong
like you know disclaimer I don’t think I
did
maybe they say I did I don’t think I did
I’m Frank Sinatra although I can’t think
the life of me what he was like say well
this is one Phil Christopher maybe we
cover this a little bit but how would
you teach an aspiring songwriter to
write a successful song well that’s most
first of all then have write a song I
don’t know with it as accessible yeah I
don’t know really I don’t know like I
say you know I actually don’t know how
to do it but what I’m doing I was now
gonna write try and write a song you I
would first of all go somewhere very
quiet like a faraway cupboard or toilet
because it’s embarrassing writing songs
you know you don’t want to do it in
public because you want it you want to
make your mistakes in private so I would
get somewhere required and you know
probably take a guitar and then just
start googling around on whatever chord
you fancy that day whatever so I’m
coming in my mind would be a to the one
up from F
so I be you know I would start with that
and start just so noodling with it just
change and it just kind of select a
rhythm or a temple that feels okay in
the mood I mean and then I just start
sort of singing over it and just see
what comes out and sometimes something
crazy feelings out and but I would kind
of go with it I just try and follow the
trail and I think the main thing is to
stick with it but not just go harness is
terrible
because often the second verse or the
chorus can get great and then you can
sort of go back and fix the beginning of
it you know so that’s what I do I just
keep going and then just write the words
as I go and sometimes the second verse
is better so I switch that to the first
risk and just keep going till I feel
like I’m and then yeah if you’re lucky
you get in a kind of pocket do you think
I can’t join this I did it recently even
though I’ve finished the album and I’m
trying not to write songs I was going to
the gym and it was closed
what I’m going to do now go now to kill
and so I picked up my guitar just doing
ding ding ding I thought oh that’s ok
I’ll put that down on my phone no voice
no don’t do that all finish it forget it
anyway this one won’t finish it so I sat
down and started with this little thing
and instead of putting it down to the
phone I just pursued it and kept going
on it and it turned out as a song it’s
interesting you say that thing about
having to find some my way you’re not
going to be overheard yeah and that must
have been difficult I watched I guess a
lot of people in the audience have seen
your appearance from the carpool carrier
you thing recently you seem that you
haven’t have a watch of it as part of
that you go back to your old child at
home yeah and finding a place you know
private to kind of write songs when
you’re living in a house of that size
hasn’t been pretty difficult yeah well
it was the toilet yeah what’s the
acoustics but that we can duck and cause
problems of it so well if you
monopolizing the toilet oh yeah it did
it occasionally and then I would have to
stop let someone go and go back in
holding my notes but another thing that
I found interesting that you said whilst
you were there was was this thing of
feeling the distance that you travel
from that place yeah but also how
formative it was how clear it was in
your mind as well as if I understand
correctly that was the first time you’ve
been back there since you looked yeah it
was you know I’d been outside cuz ya’ll
coughed a little quite a long with
Lipper and that’s here philippa oh yeah
I can’t be and so I often fly up and
then I’ll get a car health track from
the airport
and I’ll Drive whoever’s with me around
and you know I just take that all the
routes and so we go through like you
know speak where I used to live also to
say oh you know
I know I want to Drew that church over
there for an art competition which I
actually want I can I wanted there’s
only two people in the competition and
he won the year before I think they’d
let me have it but anyway you know as
I’m going around telling all these
stories and when I get to fourth Lynn
Road which is my old house which is now
a national trust thing
I never go in I would just pull up there
and you know tell them all the stories
but I never never really want to go in I
thinking it might be a bit spooky hmm my
favorite so strange going back to you
know so I’m doing this one time I’m
sitting in the car I’m showing this
friend and this older guy walks past he
goes yeah he didn’t live there but now
with with with James it was like he said
no we should go in you know and I loved
it it was great and he wasn’t spooky I
think was just it’s like this place you
know it’s just full of memories just
everything where I look around and I’m
playing playing show like me on those
benches at the back there with George
and you know coming coming here for
seeing the headmaster of all the
teachers walk in with their gowns are
like a feeling counts so you know just
it’s just so many memories getting the
cane for instance which was a wonderful
memory I’m now heavily into us and him I
blame them I was gonna get onto that
lady
and soon as you grow to go couch I like
it no how were you used to get the game
you know and I gave the kids these days
you can’t really imagine what that was
to be like but it was that was what
happened you know if you were cheeky and
we were you know we’re always just you
know Liverpool guys anyway you’ve got a
problem yo and Liverpool guys and you
know the kind of like me and George and
those kind of always so we’re always
getting in trouble and you would get
okay and you would have to hold your
hand out you go office town there was a
buzz his office headmaster and you would
that was the worst of your cold days and
you would have to hold your hand and he
would give you what they called six of
the best and he would just take this
bloody try thing I was long robbed and
even just wacky I knew you could put it
back on you just as you know hence my
love affair but damn one time
the story goes George was getting he got
it quite often I’m afraid to say but
George got it once and the teacher doing
it this time missed and got him there on
the artery the last dangerous because
you know you got arteries as I can open
them
that’s like these days you just they the
teacher be expelled me anything like
that but those days it didn’t matter
anyway so George has got this big wheel
on his wrist here he goes home and he’s
having tea with the family and he’s dad
suddenly notices what’s that only worse
I got came today you know I had to admit
it really well the next day in school
over there I think it was in George’s in
class and a little knock comes on the
door and it’s another teacher they said
to the teacher who came George cruciate
for a moment sir
there it goes outside and there’s the
teacher who came George the teacher
who’s showing George’s dad in so
George’s dad and they said did you came
my son yesterday yeah well it is a
barbaric practice in it I mean he’s kind
of crazy they did exist I simply just
waved at me and I don’t think they were
being friendly I think telling me that
we’ve got five minutes left so early
I’ve been remiss I haven’t asked you any
of these Facebook questions that’s –
yeah let’s do a couple no you go girl
yeah I think okay so we’ve got a Adina
or na Okada from Facebook in Japan hello
Paul
I just can’t wait to listen to the new
album in September which songs would you
think that John would say oh that’s a
good one from Egypt station and which
ones would your wife Nancy like most
lots of love from Nina okay um I think
John would like a song called I don’t
know I think he’d like that
and I I know that Nancy likes a song
called contra dog which I wrote to my
guitar yeah it sounded strange but it’s
a long time it’s another of my
perversions I write to guitars that’s
interesting because I I was lucky that I
was I was looking at
see soundchecking and and you were
playing that song and I was thinking it
was that song – yeah I didn’t realize it
was doing inanimate objects and people
are not unless I explain the story
people are not gonna cuz it it does
sound like it’s sort of a breakup song
it’s to someone I don’t like but it
isn’t it’s it’s it’s a long story
but so but Nancy like that yeah and
Danny Costello from Facebook in
bookstand UK and no books done well you
probably do a wall Sheffield lovely
water yeah they bottomless they do yeah
it’s so look like oh right yeah well
this is again about Egypt station I’ve
heard that you have a painting Colding
chip station can you tell us a bit more
about it and why you chose it for the
title we’ve we have kind of covered a
little bit sort of done that well the
thing was I like kind of looking at
reference books is history book for
often for like old symbols so on the
cover of Egypt station there’s an onyx
so I like that image and I’ll often see
statues or a stick that kind of
civilization and what I think’s amazing
is some of them look very modern but
they’re they’re from long time so I like
those and if I like the image I’ll put
it in the painting and just put other
things in it this is kind of a guy in
there definitely not Egyptian and I’ll
just mess it up so it kind of becomes
kind of like a little surrealist
composition and so that was that I made
that painting and I called it Egypt
station it’s like you were saying that
it seems to be something that’s fed into
your music a lot you were saying about
the thing about the Beatles sessions
ending and then you could go out and go
to theatre or whatever but you know if
I’m correct me if I’m wrong here I
believe that the the Apple on the Apple
label comes from and the Greek painting
that you you won’t yeah yeah
yeah I developed a love for art I’ll
tell you really when it started I liked
it anyway as a kid growing up but in
1953
do you believe when I was 11 coming to
this school
the Queen was ground was the coronation
year and so they had a competition which
was an essay competition and you had to
write about the monarchy so I did
everything and I happened to win one of
the categories so what am i leading with
this door we’re talking about your love
of art love of art thank you I was off
on one that so so you got a prize for
winning this competition and you got
like one of the things you got was a
book on the monarchy it’s a great PR
exercise for the monarchy and the only
thing you were allowed to choose until I
choose chose a modern art book and so
that I used to just look at that all the
time so by the time I got some money
with the Beatles in the early days I
liked to sort of look at art of stuff
and I had this really great mate it was
a owner of a gallery called Robert
Fraser and he really knew his art you
know so I could get advice from him and
I enjoyed looking at this Rennie
Magritte Belgium Belgian painter and he
he knew his dealer so Robert said to me
do you want to come to Paris and we’ll
have dinner with the dailies he’s he’s
invited us I said yeah right it was
funny because Robert was gay and I told
some of my friends you know he’s going
to Paris with Robert they go are you
sure
they’re not quite secure about my
sexuality
overlap with the S&M; I mean but getting
there are we now
anyway we got over we go and and so we
have dinner and everything then he was
above the gallery so he go downstairs or
these little stairs oh he’s like
you know someone who loves his wife and
I could I could now afford to buy a
couple now I couldn’t I mean you know
they are like but they were like three
thousand pounds and now they’re worth a
bit more but yes so so that kind of
started his love of art and in in all of
that I saw this Apple and what happened
one day
Robert knowing I love this I was out in
the background in London doing a little
music video with Mary Hopkin actually
and I’m so I was busy and Robert knew I
was busy so I came back in from the
garden and he’d left this little
painting little oil by Magritte propped
up on the thing and each split he’d just
gone so and then one of the painting was
a green apple and written across within
Magritte’s writing was aurevoir
so that is the coolest most conceptual
thing anyone’s ever done just leave I’m
agreed with or avoid and you know so
yeah that’s where it came from so and
people say why was the Apple because you
know there was an apple before Apple you
know because people think that we made
an apple but we mean Apple so and why we
did it people said why did you do
something
it was a is for Apple dude we just like
that it was near the beginning of the
alphabet Apple like Ellen I need list
would come Ali we kind of like them we
like that I do and then Abba went but
obidos by being a B so they came before
us on the list I’m not gonna get
forgiven if I don’t wound I would love
to talk to you for the maybe until the
end of time but I know we have to stop
them and thanks ever so much for
submitting tonight questioning it’s good
for I have to say to ever to everyone
hang around as well because I believe
something exciting’s gonna happen behind
that curtain quite soon I also know that
you’re gonna come and play in Liverpool
in December sorry yeah so everybody
should prepare themselves for that yeah
we are playing the Echo Arena and in
December but the thing is we also have
tomorrow we have a little secret gig
somewhat unlivable indicated night I’ve
got kidding you Jarvis would I like to
write well I’m not Clinton go ladies and
gentlemen please
[Applause]
you both
you

yeah were so remember kind of coming in universes oh my god it was like thousand boys so and I’d never been in a school this is a School for the Performing Arts yeah I wonder what it was like at that time when you were here was like creativity encouraged in that you know in the school as it was that not really no in fact the worst was music yeah

01:54 there was like no encouragement in fact 02:00 a typical music lesson will be there’d 02:02 be about thirty boys in the class and 02:05 the teacher come in we don’t be there 02:08 ready for a music lesson teacher come in 02:11 and have a little record plan in the

02:14 middle of the room and he put he’ll peel 02:16 and he just I want you to listen to this 02:20 point and let me know what you think of 02:22 it he put it on and he go out which is 02:26 called– fatal you know he’s like ahhh 02:29 so we would post one guy on the door as 02:33 the lookout and then we get the cities 02:35 and the cards and everything out and you 02:38 know let his record we probably took the 02:41 record off yeah and he come back look at 02:44 it he’s got the smoke away then we 02:48 looked very studiously I said what did 02:51 you think of it bored so this is really 02:53 good so when I was it we never got any 02:59 more than that never even though 03:01 dududududududududu I’m sure none of that 03:04 kind of behavior goes on in this school 03:10 now you know it was it was exciting to 03:13 say cos having the whole range of Ages 03:17 from us little plebs you know to the

03:21 swat East prefect sand head boys 03:25 teachers and the headmaster who was 03:28 junior Edwards who is known as the bass 03:31 the bass the bass ba said okay mr. Pratt 03:36 oh and he was the one who’d cane you cuz 03:40 we’re talking all days in I mean in fact 03:44 this is before I was here what Charles 03:47 Dickens stood on this stage and lectured 03:50 no pressure 03:53 I’m not trying to put you off but so he 03:58 was it was like you know you know you’re 04:06 left-handed did you get any stick for 04:09 that like at school I examined my mum 04:11 telling me stories about we were to say 04:12 oh you can’t walk right with your left 04:14 hand 04:14 mmm and actually conscious you get 04:17 forces to not me but my mum got a lot of 04:20 stick about it oh yeah I don’t know did 04:22 you know it wasn’t too bad 04:25 well I do have a distant memory of 04:27 sitting down to write with my left hand 04:29 and writing my name backwards right in P 04:34 but going that way instead of going that 04:37 way mirror writing 04:42 what does this say about him so you know 04:46 so but they never told me if I was 04:48 allowed to run left so you say you 04:50 weren’t really getting music education 04:53 at school so what do you consider the 04:55 things that didn’t teach you about music 04:58 where did you get that info from my dad 05:00 was a good amateur pianist and he was 05:02 the guy at the family parties who would 05:05 play the piano and they’d roll the rug 05:09 back and all the ladies would sit around 05:11 the room with little drinks because if 05:14 you have little drinks you don’t get 05:17 drunk 05:18 unless you have a lot of little place 05:20 which is what they did they never but 05:25 they would then sing all the all the old 05:27 songs of the time of their time so this 05:31 all went in so I kind of still know 05:34 those old songs and he would play the 05:36 piano and I think all of that kind of

05:41 ended up but and when later he couldn’t 05:48 play the piano he got arthritis so I 05:50 ended up was the guy who played all 05:52 these old songs my problem thank you 05:58 well I mean that I think that’s one way 05:59 I learn music and then the other thing 06:02 was that he’d given me a trumpet for my 06:06 birthday and I kind of learned because 06:08 he used to be a trumpet player is this 06:10 is a lammeter band and this was in the 06:12 20s when he was in the band so it’s all 06:15 that boniato to touch stuff that still 06:18 be see in the films you know but he 06:22 didn’t want to teach me he thought I 06:24 should learn properly and so I tried a 06:27 few times to learn properly I but hated 06:30 it when you say properly talk about it 06:33 to learn how to read music’s read music 06:35 and scales dudududududududu shouldn’t be 06:42 putting people off it was a really 06:43 important yes this is what I mean to say 06:46 to by the way hello world were on 06:49 Facebook 06:50 hey it’s a big – Liverpool for you folks 06:58 yeah no don’t let us put you off 06:59 learning music is a really great thing 07:04 now but the the sort of guitar craze 07:08 came along as it’s given it’s like a 07:10 folk thing and we all were very into it

07:14 so a lot of people got guitar so I asked 07:16 my dad if I could trade the trumpet in 07:18 for a guitar which having been a 07:21 musician he it was fine with so then I 07:25 had a guitar and you met lots of friends 07:29 who had guitars he would just talk 07:31 so it’s were about Jorge who went to 07:33 this cool George Harrison I met him he 07:36 used to get on the bus 07:38 the stop after I did I was about a half 07:41 an hour ride into this school so if we 07:45 ever sat next to each other we were just 07:46 develop our friendship and started 07:48 talking about guitars so then we learned 07:50 chords off each other and the great 07:53 thing was and then saying happen with 07:55 John the great thing was that years 07:59 later if John and I was showing the guys 08:02 a song 08:05 George automatically knew anything we 08:08 knew you know it wasn’t like we knew 08:10 anything more he knew exactly so we 08:13 could just go Jimmy G to play through 08:14 and he would know the song you know so 08:16 but I think that’s really where our 08:18 music took off once we had this and of 08:24 course it was a crazy stock and roll 08:25 actually was coming in you know from 08:28 skillfully and I remember actually being 08:31 these used to be pews not these nice 08:33 comfortable seats you’re all sitting in 08:35 we had Borden benches you know and I 08:39 remember sitting back there with a copy 08:41 of a music paper the enemy and seeing a 08:44 picture of Elvis Presley you know we 08:51 just enthralled with this guy and then

08:53 when we heard his records well that was 08:54 it so we wanted to do that we want it to 08:58 be like that that was how we wanted to 09:00 live that’s interested 09:02 would you say that you saw Elvis before 09:04 you heard in that hmm it’s quite 09:06 interesting so that must have been kind 09:08 of a bit mind-blowing to imagine what it 09:11 might be like and then to actually hear 09:13 it was an ad for Heartbreak Hotel his 09:17 first records and yeah we just we just 09:21 fell for the whole thing you know we 09:23 just thought he was a great singer he 09:26 had a great sense of humor he made great 09:29 records and we just we just thought was 09:32 it then so we got into a group John was 09:35 already in a group so but it was kind of 09:38 you know you learned everything just by 09:43 a year and we never learned to write 09:45 anything down well this wasn’t I wanted 09:48 to ask you about how you remembered 09:50 songs because if tape recorders were

09:53 around they must have been really bulky 09:55 mm-hmm it’s not like today where if you 09:57 kind of have an idea and you’re out 09:58 somewhere you can like comment into your 10:00 phone like that so how did you kind of 10:02 remember I always think that was a great 10:05 thing that we didn’t have and we did 10:06 like you say the big bulky one was 10:08 called Grundig a little blinking green 10:10 eye in the front of it and what we never 10:13 had one we knew a guy who did so we 10:15 borrowed it once and we put a couple of 10:18 little songs down on it but we mainly 10:20 used it for prank phone calls 10:24 well explain you’re gonna have to 10:27 explain that okay here’s how it went a 10:29 fear John just in my house in four 10:32 Thornton Road and we’ve got this thing 10:35 so we recently got you know we should do 10:37 we should record a bit of dialogue and 10:42 then leave applause and they’d say a 10:45 little bit more leaving pauses and will 10:48 ring up somewhat and then we’ll record 10:50 the whole thing you know so if we ended 10:55 up ringing his one of his schoolteachers 10:58 called mr. popjoy good name so the 11:02 dialogue went like this year we put on 11:03 voices hello there’s almost a pop Jordan 11:08 pod joint here we’ve ringing about the 11:13 bananas yes the bananas you ordered so 11:25 we didn’t join to your question we 11:28 didn’t really do much recording you know 11:32 but the thing is it was a good thing was 11:35 that we had to write songs you could 11:37 remember and I think that turned out to 11:40 be a good thing so you know John and I 11:43 would have a writing session and we 11:45 write something go away I would normally 11:48 the afternoon so they would go away we 11:50 have an evening out and stuff and in the 11:53 middle of evening you think but it

11:58 always came back in the morning first 12:00 thing in the morning 12:01 oh yeah oh you play it again and you 12:04 just remembered it and we ended up 12:05 saying well if we can’t remember it how 12:08 to expect other people to so I suppose 12:10 you were right and stuff that was 12:12 memorable and I hate to say we’re still 12:15 remembering it now you know that’s very 12:19 true all they always time Jesus 12:24 and I used to do a radio show and one 12:28 feature that was a thing called on this 12:30 day 12:32 did you go like that hair to do in the 12:34 voice ominous yeah I found that two 12:38 things on this day from your life the 12:43 first one is the 25th of July 1963 12:47 you played the fourth of six nights at 12:50 Hammersmith at Weston super Mare Odeon I 12:54 don’t expect you to remember that but I

12:58 just wonder how’d you do something wrong 13:01 to be sentenced to be playing Wessex 13:04 nice 13:06 seems a lot long time to be playing 13:08 weston-super-mare we could fill it then 13:12 now I really think it was just because 13:14 you know I don’t know we just we did 13:17 what the manager told us and you’re 13:18 playing weston-super-mare and of course 13:20 because it’s a seaside place we loved it 13:22 went on the beach got prawns he’s oh you 13:27 know it wasn’t too much the plane that 13:29 was just what we did in the evening but 13:31 it was good fun and there was another 13:34 one it’s not quite the right day that in 13:37 a couple of days in 1968 you went into 13:40 the studio and recorded Hey Jude and the 13:43 session went from 8:30 p.m. till 4:00 13:46 a.m. the reason I mention that is just 13:52 as well as we’re here I wonder if that 13:56 gives any insight into that you know the 13:58 recording process how do you capture a 14:00 song you know when do you decide you’ve 14:02 said this thing about you know you yeah 14:04 but you if it sticks with you then you 14:06 know it’s worth having then I guess the 14:09 next decision is when do you try and 14:12 capture it try and get it down on tape 14:14 how do you make those decisions you know 14:16 well I think when when the songs done 14:19 you you go boy what happened with me 14:22 without albums is I just write songs 14:24 till I’ve got too many 14:26 and I think why I better record them so 14:29 I can write another book 14:30 so yeah you wait till you’ve got the 14:33 song finished and 14:35 I’ve written Hey Jude I checked it out 14:40 played it to John and he liked it there 14:44 was one line in it that I thought I was 14:46 going to change 14:47 I remember him I’m offering my little 14:49 music room up at the top of the house on 14:52 this little magic piano I had and I’m 14:56 playing the song and I go the movement 14:58 you need is on your shoulder and I tenor 15:00 honestly I’ll be changing that don’t

15:02 worry 15:03 he looks so you won’t you know the best 15:06 lying minutes so you know that that was 15:08 like so each signed off on it so we went 15:12 to a Pierrot wasn’t available what we 15:16 wanted to know that it was ready to 15:18 record once it sort of getting somewhere 15:20 so we went to a place called Trident 15:22 which was in Soho and little studio we 15:27 used to use and we just sort of went in 15:30 that probably like you say in the 15:32 evening we always used to work only a 15:35 day on during the day because that was 15:38 the way you were supposed to but as we 15:41 got more and more successful as time 15:43 went on we’d heard that people like

15:45 Frank Sinatra worked through the night 15:47 so he’s a relapse all of that so that 15:51 game became another cool thing to do so 15:54 we came in and we’d kind of you know I 15:58 but I play it through so everyone knew 16:01 it and you start recording it and I 16:06 think easily you know with memories 16:09 quite a long time you get little stories 16:13 that you tell 16:14 and then I’m always back on my mind 16:16 going is this true you’re making this up 16:20 but I remember you know I think sitting 16:25 down and doing hate you 16:26 don’t me and then just realizing Ringo 16:30 had gone to the toilet but he’s got his 16:33 drunkard over there any crap that he got 16:35 today 16:35 so I hated you so now luckily he didn’t 16:38 come in for a couple of verses and then 16:40 he’s got to come in I just see him at 16:42 the corner of my own thinking this is 16:43 quite a good take I’m singing this well 16:52 well I think we’re just going to say 16:55 that is true to size of time I like 17:00 we’re going to ask some questions from 17:02 people have sent in questions I know 17:04 those questions from people who were 17:06 here in the audience people who are 17:08 studying here at lit also some questions 17:10 that have come from Facebook look could 17:13 I start with one question which kind of 17:15 is almost related to that which comes 17:17 from my friend Richard hauling a 17:19 musician from Sheffield nevermind that 17:23 was that their wit and he was wandering 17:29 him as a little never mind as long as 17:31 you’ve got your health 17:36 he mentioned Ringo then and he wanted to 17:40 know what Custer was a craze around that 17:42 time when you started of people having 17:44 pseudonyms like Billy Fury and all stuff 17:46 like that and Ringo Starr hmm 17:49 did any the rest of you think of having 17:52 some kind of like superhero a pseudonym 17:55 yeah this is what you thought you had to 17:58 do yeah you know Paul McCartney it’s

18:02 like it sounds good that’s all right now 18:05 I’ve grown into it put a lot of work 18:08 into 18:11 but ya know we did think we had to be 18:14 more glamorous so I was Paul Rummel 18:20 sound and we went on a little tour with 18:24 a guy called Johnny gentle movies 18:26 because yeah this is the thing all the 18:29 other people were like Billy Fury Danny 18:32 turn boost morning wild and we’ve got 18:35 landed with Johnny gentle alright 18:41 playing and we’re backing him up in 18:43 there and and you get you go up there 18:46 and to be all the little because it’s 18:47 got wee little Scottish fans they go to 18:55 George watch Carl Harrison and John it

19:01 was Long John Silver but wrinkl came 19:07 with the name and everything you know 19:09 why because he was we always kind of he 19:12 was the oldest in the group but you know 19:14 also just like the professional and we 19:16 were kind of amateurs we saw the 19:18 students I was I think one of the nice 19:21 things about the Beatles we weren’t 19:23 really serious about showbiz just sort 19:26 of dragged into it you have to be in it 19:27 to play but Ringo had his group using 19:32 Rory storm and the Hurricanes and 19:36 another shooter they powerful it was 19:41 actually 19:42 Rory cold well anyway so he was within 19:47 that band and they were like we thought 19:49 they were like really pros because they 19:51 had a season at portland’s which is a 19:54 hardy camp for any of you global 19:56 listeners and that was a great gig 20:00 you’ve got to go there you got to sort 20:02 of settle in you’ve got your rooms you 20:03 got the girls I knew would be rock stars 20:07 you know so ring dough became Ringo 20:09 Starr with lots of rings for that you 20:12 know he was the only one but yeah we 20:15 changed you know poor Roma it’s good 20:19 I might go back to it and that’s not a 20:23 look really we are that maybe this is 20:26 slightly related this is a someone who 20:30 should be builded Steven Geisler hope 20:33 I’m pronouncing that correctly Steven 20:34 guys all Giesler are you here you can 20:38 just say present sir yeah Stevens 20:42 question is if music hadn’t worked out 20:44 what are the career could you seen 20:46 yourself doing well you know at that 20:49 time in this school you would go to the 20:52 careers master I don’t know if it still 20:55 happens you know is he leaving you sort 20:57 of school to go out into the big world 21:01 and I went in this guy and he’s talking 21:03 to me what he liked it and he turned out 21:06 I only had enough qualifications to be a 21:08 teacher 21:10 you know it’s like you’re no good or you 21:13 can be a teacher 21:15 won’t teach other people not to be good 21:18 you’ve got a knack so that what I was 21:22 like that you to go and be yeah but 21:25 you’re you’re breaking that kind of

21:27 thing within this Academy oh yeah yeah 21:31 we don’t do that anymore no much 21:33 groovier now is one is there a Brian 21:38 Campbell in the audience 21:39 oh right Brian’s question is is there a 21:44 song you are jealous of and wish that 21:47 you were driven and if so why or what is 21:50 it 21:50 yeah there’s always a couple that I hear 21:53 you know that I think are nice and I 21:55 would like to I liked stings field of 21:58 gold and I thought you know what I 22:01 should have read that how dare he did 22:05 you let me know that yeah you stole my 22:10 soul 22:11 and I like some another one here 22:16 some of these are very long and the 22:18 favori won’t get a chance to go through 22:19 all of them you’re whipping through them 22:22 there I’ve got them here but he’s gone 22:24 gone out of order so I’m totally I’m on 22:27 Georgia Wren I don’t know you might say 22:29 I’m on number 10 Thomas Whitaker you’ve 22:32 really belted them all right Thomas 22:37 would like to know what was the last

22:38 piece of music or album you listen to 22:41 that you found quite impressive all as 22:43 stuck with it I think probably Kendrick 22:50 Lamar yeah and I liked sorry I mean you 22:57 know talk about modern soul so the last 22:59 piece of music most people and not so 23:03 modern 23:04 I liked Kanye’s talk Twisted Fantasy 23:08 like that’s why I ended up working with 23:10 because I liked that other pieces 23:14 there’s one out at the moment that I 23:16 think is very catchy which is Christine 23:19 and the Queen’s record I like that it is 23:23 like totally Michael Jackson rip off 23:26 well we don’t mind and now did hear 23:32 music now because he was in so many 23:34 different ways with these I know without 23:37 – but I’m talking about what because 23:41 there are so many I suppose industry 23:43 speak would be delivery platforms or but 23:46 there’s so many ways you could I love it 23:48 when you talk dirty 23:54 what say that really good yeah I mean 23:59 you know as I don’t if you could hear 24:02 before you took the stage I was saying I 24:05 used to stay at home just listen to the 24:07 radio hoping a Beatles song would come 24:09 on and record it if we did I’m sorry 24:12 about that no playboy was silly but you 24:16 know now there are many of the ways for 24:17 kids or anybody you know to hear music 24:20 so how do you me it’s mainly radio 24:24 probably in the car yes you know in any 24:26 journey or just listening here 24:30 I still have CDs come on and and I 24:36 listened to buy them and listen to them 24:39 and then I just Spotify mm-hmm call me 24:44 phone so you know quite a few ways I

24:49 still play vinyl yeah well it leads me 24:53 understanding I wanted to talk to you 24:55 about actually because I was reading 24:56 stuff he was saying about you you record 24:58 egypt station and one of the things you 25:01 said about it was that you want it he 25:03 wanted to make an album that was like an 25:05 album and you remembered 25:07 albums are mmm which for me when I think 25:11 of that I think of a vinyl album I think 25:13 that that’s in a way recorded music 25:17 found its ideal home you know the length 25:20 of them of an album the fact it’s got 25:22 two sides and stuff but I don’t know 25:24 what was that what you meant by that 25:26 yeah I mean what I thought was these 25:29 days you’ve got you know the big stars 25:32 like people saying Taylor Swift and 25:34 Kendrick and people no more particularly 25:38 the first two and their songs are in a 25:41 way a collection of singles you know 25:44 they’re all great commercial tracks but

25:46 it doesn’t kind of roll through like a 25:48 Pink Floyd album used to or Vietnam and 25:53 I so I thought well I can’t compete with 25:55 that kind of Taylor Swift thing she’s 25:58 got better legs than me 26:01 Julie you’re handling you I know that we 26:03 know but so you know I thought well 26:09 maybe what I can do you just do sort of 26:12 what used to be called a concept album 26:14 so it’s it is an album that if you want 26:17 to you can sort of listen all the way 26:19 and it should roll through and take you 26:23 someone that’s what this new one so the 26:28 cover is is that I was gonna ask you 26:33 about the title of the album but I 26:35 believe that’s the name of the painting 26:38 that’s on the on the comment yeah yeah I 26:41 did a painting and it had Egyptian 26:45 iconography in it because I do I like 26:49 that kind of thing so I put some of 26:50 these images innovating and mixed it up 26:53 a bit and just to remember it I call the 26:57 Egypt station because in that sort of 26:59 Egyptian things and I never thought any 27:01 more were people quite liked it so I 27:03 like that one you know and I was looking 27:05 at it one day and I thought it’s got a 27:07 nice title that Egypt station oh that 27:10 could be the new album’s title and then 27:13 I thought you know what the painting 27:14 could be the cover hmm so we started 27:17 that’s where it started and then we got 27:19 some really good art directors who took 27:22 it and so you know we start off like 27:28 with a station noise so here is sort of 27:31 in a station and then a choir swells out 27:36 of that so it’s like heavenly station 27:38 now you’re tripping dude 27:42 and then he goes into the first song 27:43 being on anything Arizona yeah and then 27:46 and I shouldn’t work am I allowed to I’m 27:49 not really spoil it but then at the end 27:50 you was we go to the station again we go

27:54 to the station yeah so you know that 27:58 that’s that was the idea we should do 28:00 something like like that for people who 28:03 like that kind of album that goes right 28:05 through wasn’t just musical people are 28:09 just only gonna choose the single that 28:10 they like only gonna choose that track 28:13 in that track but there will be those 28:14 amongst us who will listen all the ways 28:18 yeah and I think as we were saying about 28:20 I think an album is the format for that 28:25 I mean I I do that I don’t know whether 28:27 I’m representative of any demographic or 28:30 even human being but I enjoy that as a 28:35 thing to do to sit on the sexy foot of 28:37 an album on and just it’s a nice amount 28:39 of time 2025 minutes and you go into 28:42 that world for a bit and then you kind

28:44 of resurface make self a cup of tea put 28:47 the other side on if you want or or 28:49 whatever it’s a ya know it’s a really 28:51 pleasant way to absorb the music I think 28:54 yeah well so that’s the idea with the 28:57 new album good now here’s another one 29:02 this is kind of well this may be this is 29:04 slightly related number eleven 29:09 Carter Fleming are you are you present 29:12 hello Carter Carter would like to know 29:15 have the developments in technology for 29:17 recorded in composing music affected 29:20 your writing process in any way kind of 29:23 ties into what we’re talking yeah I 29:25 think I think it has actually and I 29:28 think it’s maybe affected it adversely 29:32 because you could record anything 29:33 anytime just reach your phone you got it 29:37 so I find myself with like thousands of 29:42 sketches that will do yeah it’s like 29:48 I’ll finish that one day so I’ve got 29:50 thousands of things to finish and I 29:53 don’t think that’s a great thing when 29:55 you didn’t have that you tended to have 29:58 to finish it so the process that John 30:02 and I used kind of still how are you 30:06 still the one I use and it was just 30:08 basically to sit down come up with a bit 30:11 of an idea of a song and finish it just 30:14 keep doing it keep doing it until you 30:17 got to the end and then you’d written 30:19 the song which I think was probably good 30:23 rather than having a little fragment a 30:27 little sketch that maybe months later 30:30 you’ll return to and you’ll be trying to 30:33 recapture the vibe that you did 30:36 listening to it and so I don’t think 30:40 it’s as good a system and that I would 30:42 say I’m complaining about that just 30:44 because too easy to put ideas down and 30:47 and then just not bother and does that 30:51 also go through to this studio as well 30:53 because obviously now you can like 30:56 record everything and then you can if a 30:59 bit goes wrong you can edit that bit out 31:01 and let’s combine 31:02 take one with yeah six thousand and then 31:06 auto-tune it so it’s all same key oh

31:09 you’ve seen me record oh I know that 31:11 tape I what you can do know by wonder 31:15 with this record it doesn’t sound like 31:17 you 31:18 doesn’t that way so I wonder whether we 31:20 know what was your method winning no I 31:23 think it is a really good strong thing 31:25 if you can get the original performance 31:28 with your band or however down 31:32 all-in-one so you’ve got the kind of 31:34 spirit of it and so quite a few tracks 31:37 on the album we just did with the band 31:39 you know we learned them and do them 31:42 like old school and then we maybe 31:45 overdubbed maybe did this and that you 31:47 know but there is something comes

31:51 through it’s the spontaneity and why I 31:55 remembered that I must do that but 31:57 listening to all Beatle records yeah I 32:00 could hear them this I was gonna fresh 32:02 they’re right in your face you know 32:04 particularly the real early ones and I 32:09 think it was just it’s the spirit got 32:12 onto the record you know but we didn’t 32:14 mess around 32:15 oh yeah we’re talking all about you know 32:17 how we record it we first came down from 32:21 them who got our first recording 32:23 contract with Sir George Martin blessing 32:26 and we were told what they wanted us to 32:31 do cuz they were grownups and we were 20 32:33 something and we didn’t know and no idea 32:37 what you did in her cordless you so they 32:39 just said show up at 10 o’clock and 32:42 between 10:00 and 10:30 get ready 32:45 you know tune up and obviously he’s a 32:47 cup of tea or whatever we want to do and 32:49 then at 10:30 the producer will come in 32:52 and you’ll start the session and from 32:55 there you had one and a half hours to 32:57 finish that song completely which we 33:02 never thought it was a pressure because 33:04 we didn’t know anything else and they 33:07 just sort of said you know George just 33:09 so George Martin would come down and me 33:11 and John afternoon was unless it was 33:14 George’s song but it was after me and 33:15 John would have written the song the 33:17 week before and because our manager ring 33:21 goes up and say you’ve got a week off we 33:23 got great he said to write the next 33:26 album 33:27 we don’t graze I mean it seemed like 33:31 enough time you know so we did it and we 33:34 bring it in on the Monday morning and it 33:36 was only me and John knew it so we had a 33:40 couple of acoustic guitars so we just 33:42 singing do-do-do-do-do – whatever 33:46 George and Ringo would watch it and the 33:49 Georgia clock the cords we can go into 33:52 yeah it’s the beat and then we just 33:55 separate I go on bass John and georgia 33:57 vonnegut aren’t ringer on drums and we

33:59 would just start recording so that would 34:03 keep us about we probably had about an 34:05 hour and 10 left to do this record and 34:09 now because that was the only time you 34:10 had you did it and then you had to do 34:13 another song in the morning they did an 34:18 hour off it was like 10:30 to do the 34:24 maths 10:30 plus 1/2 wellness school I’m 34:30 gonna say one subject amongst the many 34:35 anybody then you’d have a fun one from 34:39 12 you’d have till 1:30 34:40 you had a break of an hour you came back 34:42 and you did it all again two more songs 34:45 and so you were knocked off by five ish 34:47 and you put four songs in the can which

34:52 you know right today standards is like 34:53 silly what the thing heard of that music 34:58 is a deal I’ve got the snare sound by 35:00 that 35:01 just about switch the computer on yeah 35:04 yeah no it’s true yeah so it was a byte 35:07 system and most of all the early Beatles 35:11 records were done like that and what I 35:15 liked about it was after you’d finished 35:17 you put in this hard day you had four 35:22 songs so you’re kind of prairies then 35:25 you go out in the evening you’d have 35:27 something to eat or maybe go to a play 35:28 or something and I think that informed 35:32 the next day yeah you know because we’re 35:34 down in London so I might go to see like 35:36 the National Theatre and see a play I 35:39 was going out with an actress at the 35:40 time so we’d go out and see Juno and the 35:43 paycock gonna Colin Blakely in it and it 35:47 was so good you know nationally don’t 35:49 worry did you come back you know yeah 35:51 and I don’t know it’s somehow informed 35:53 what you did the next day you raised the 35:55 bar a little bit so I was always glad 35:57 that we had those hard working days but 36:01 the evenings off yeah the way you speak 36:05 you speak about it I wonder do you ever 36:06 come here and like have you ever taken a 36:08 class here or anything like that 36:10 you know yeah are you saying about the 36:12 thing of people getting something down 36:14 quick oh yeah I haven’t done sort of a 36:18 recording thing I do the songwriters so 36:22 I come up and I basically listen to a 36:26 bunch of songwriting students who are 36:29 kind of my students you know and I 36:32 always say to them okay look you know I 36:35 don’t know how to do this I know which 36:38 is look yeah oh yeah right 36:43 teacher see ya I was always testing well 36:47 I mean is I actually don’t know how to 36:50 do it and I don’t want to know how to do 36:52 it I sit down to write a song I hope 36:54 it’s something I don’t know how to do 36:57 and I hope it’s noon you know I don’t 36:59 want to think always got to do that I’ve

37:01 got to do this I think I find myself 37:03 getting predictable I’ll try and break I 37:05 think so say that to them and and then 37:10 after the shocks come off their faces 37:12 they will then play me and so 37:15 they play me their work and I’m just 37:17 kind of critiquing I’ll say I’m just 37:19 imagined we’re writing together and what 37:22 I would do would be this and by the way 37:24 you don’t have to accept it because it’s 37:26 your song oh my but generally you know 37:29 except now you know what I mean 37:36 hopefully I made good situation know 37:39 that I mean I think that’s really

37:40 interesting because as you say this is 37:43 an academy and it’s it’s to some extent 37:47 a formal education and that’s not 37:49 something that you had in your in your 37:52 music education and it’s interesting to 37:56 hear that you you know communicate that 37:59 because I agree with you I think music 38:01 it’s a very kind of slippery beast to 38:05 how you tell whether something is good 38:07 or not is really like one I don’t know 38:12 whether you get this thing but like one 38:14 day you can write a song you think yes 38:15 Grammy’s come on and then you listen to 38:19 the next day oh my god it’s crap yeah 38:21 and I know that and incan work the other 38:24 way like you right so do you think it’s 38:26 children rubbish and then and then 38:28 listen to the next day in it and you 38:29 realize it’s good so that kind of thing 38:30 where you can never pin it down in some 38:35 ways is frustrating but also is what’s 38:37 exciting about it because you never tame 38:39 it anyway that’s why I mean you know 38:41 that’s what I don’t really want to tame 38:42 it or know how it goes you know and the 38:45 thing is we learn it by doing this the 38:49 way we happen to do it or happen to have 38:51 done it I’m not saying the Beatles all 38:53 the Liverpool groups all the British 38:55 groups the British Invasion for America 38:57 I don’t know any of them really knew how 39:00 to write or read music we didn’t need to 39:03 I were talking to Jeff Lynn about it 39:04 well we just made you look didn’t we you 39:08 know enjoy that’s what we do we just 39:09 sort of made it okay but I I will work 39:12 with people who do know how to do 39:16 furnaces someone’s got to be 39:18 orchestrated I will bring in someone who 39:21 actually knows what to tell the 39:23 orchestra you know 39:24 I’d have to write it out but often they 39:28 will say to me oh that song was that 39:32 three four two four twin don’t apart

39:36 because we you know we made it up so we 39:39 just go close to you know good day 39:42 sunshine bad the bad and there’s 39:45 somewhere in there’s a two four bar or 39:47 something you know but we just went oh 39:49 it went like that yeah change is there 39:52 yeah and I think it was more exciting 39:55 yeah a minute it’s it’s written for me 39:58 not for of course you all you kids 40:01 around the world studying music and your 40:04 parents spending all that money no I 40:09 mean I you know it is also great to go

40:11 to the other route it’s just not the 40:13 route I went yeah well it’s funny even 40:15 reminded me of something now because one 40:17 of the most frustrating things of my 40:19 adolescence was buying the Beatles song 40:22 book because I was such a family knows

40:25 Hannah and sitting down and then 40:26 suddenly out of this terrible crushing 40:29 realization that I couldn’t play any of 40:31 the songs because they had all these 40:34 kind of thoughts that were like all over 40:36 it like that and I wondered about that 40:38 whether I bet they didn’t consult you 40:41 about those songbook so or did they did 40:44 that kind of so how do you play this 40:45 song no no I mean the chord symbols was 40:48 all we could ever read on achieve music 40:51 and the words so that’s what we used we 40:54 would just look at the chord symbol and 40:56 we knew a lot of the chords you know as 40:59 we because the thing about the wheels we 41:01 started here in Liverpool and played 41:03 little clubs then we went to Hamburg I’m 41:05 going to Hamburg was like a big 41:07 experience not just for young kids let 41:09 off the leash 41:09 in the Strip District oh that was also 41:14 revealing but just that we played so 41:18 long we played like sometimes eight 41:20 hours straight through kind of thing 41:22 we have an hour on an hour off but 41:26 because we played so much you’ll and 41:29 look to stuff we learn lots of song 41:32 school you didn’t want to get bored and 41:33 you know at that age the worst thing is 41:36 your God we’re doing these same ten 41:38 songs again so we have millions of songs 41:41 and millions of chords so that’s what 41:45 happened we sort of developed just along 41:49 the way by learning chords I mean the 41:51 used to be a shop where we got our 41:53 guitars here called Hasse’s hit on by a 41:57 guy called Frank Hesse and in there 42:00 there was like the guy who could play 42:02 the guitar you know in the music shop 42:05 and he was our big hero Jim Greta and he 42:08 would he would play it was a Jazza

42:11 so he would sometimes play he’s amazing 42:14 cause I remember me and George just 42:17 studying it God why is that 42:19 oh yeah he’s like an F chord but he got 42:22 these funny little things going here oh 42:24 yeah okay and we learned it I mean I 42:26 still done always call it an F demented 42:29 or something 42:32 but we learned it so that it suddenly 42:36 round about that beard you hear it on 42:38 quite a few of our songs it’s in 42:40 Michelle do you do yeah I mean till 42:49 there was you yeah we just used and but 42:52 that was a thing you know and it is it 42:54 is funny because I remember you know 42:58 talking with loads of groups and the 43:00 kind of people we’d hang out with be 43:02 windy doing shows and things of TV shows 43:05 and I remember sitting around with 43:07 Travis and the guys from Travis and 43:10 we’re just chatting and he were playing

43:14 me one of those songs and he sort of was 43:16 in a and then it went to F sharp minor 43:19 so I said I like that 43:22 F sharp minor and what is that what it’s 43:25 called he says we call it one up from F 43:30 Alden it is well that’s it as long as 43:35 everybody in the band calls it that then 43:37 you’re alright exactly it’s so have 43:40 another question here this is number 12 43:44 John Reynolds white John John Reynolds 43:49 would like to know out of all the 43:50 musicians you’ve worked with who do you 43:52 admire the most and why out of all the 43:57 ones I’ve worked with it would be fellow 44:01 Beatles it would be John who was pretty 44:05 cool and George and Ringo you know 44:11 having worked with John so one on one 44:16 you know I I could see it I got to see 44:19 his brooms before the world did so you 44:22 know I would get to hear across the 44:24 universe and Julia and some of these 44:27 songs you know and so you know I’m a big 44:32 fan and when we work together 44:36 thing like day in the life he often what 44:40 would happen is whoever was going to be 44:41 the sort of creator of this song would 44:44 bring in the first verse so he said you 44:47 knew what was going on read the news 44:49 today oh boy 44:50 okay and then we sit down and we take it 44:53 from there which the write it all down 44:54 and develop it and do the thing so yeah 44:58 so I’ve seen John at work you know so 45:02 obviously and little things he did were 45:06 I thought brilliant you know I I started 45:10 a song it’s getting better all the time 45:13 and he went he couldn’t get much worse

45:16 go get that down so you know just those 45:20 little things were you’d I think I think 45:23 and then I think Stevie Wonder you got 45:27 to go to Stevie who is just a musical 45:30 monster he’s fantastic everything 45:35 because he’s got something was going on 45:37 about Stevie Wonder to me the other day 45:39 like you know he’s got his he’s even got 45:41 two voices he’s got like the hive Stevie 45:43 and then he’s got the hungry Stevie and 45:47 then then he can play the harmonica and 45:50 then somebody showed me this clip the 45:52 other day where he just plays the drums 45:54 amazing his voice it’s my great trauma 45:55 yeah yeah you know he is and the little 45:59 guitar thing he’s got now obviously what

46:03 you know I worked with him we did the 46:06 record ebony and ivory which some people 46:09 thought was a big glib but to me I 46:11 thought it’s kind of cool thing you know 46:13 the black and white living together in 46:15 harmony what’s wrong with that but it 46:18 was it was great fun working with Stevie 46:21 on there he we came out to Montserrat 46:26 which was George Martin studio in the 46:28 Caribbean and so we were working there 46:32 and Linda my first wife Linda 46:37 I said well invite Stevie over Oh God 46:40 it was a Sunday we were taking the day 46:42 off so I said great so the hasty 46:45 do you fancy corners alone oh yeah yeah 46:49 yeah sure so I said great I think about 46:53 two o’clock blood too right so totally 46:56 two of long she’s okay so she starts 46:58 cooking with two o’clock in mind so 47:00 three o’clock comes and I go hey Steve 47:05 how you doing man what’s going on you 47:07 know oh oh oh yeah 47:09 I said you’re coming over with you oh 47:12 yeah yeah yeah I’m just heading out the 47:14 door 47:14 yeah I’ll be there in two seconds well 47:17 ten o’clock at night I’m serious and 47:21 that felt like going behind you 47:31 but he just each out of rollerblades and 47:36 it was okay because did he have a good 47:38 excuse artist no hey you know what you 47:42 didn’t need one that’s the thing about 47:44 Steve you just you just gotta go with it 47:46 he’s just so good and you can’t say you 47:51 know but yeah dinner was somewhat burned 47:58 got one here number 13 David Harrison 48:03 this question actually this is also my 48:08 mom asked this question as well 48:09 mmm-hmm so it must be brilliant 48:12 it must be what’s your favorite cover 48:16 version of a Beatles song because I 48:17 think I think the Beatles do hold the 48:20 record for the most covered band ever so

48:22 there’s a lot of conversions out there 48:24 on this so yeah there’s only caught urea 48:26 yeah 48:28 the wonder manliest one that really 48:30 caught my ear was pastor Phillips as a 48:33 kind of R&B; singer and she did a female 48:36 version of and I love gold and I love 48:40 him which is really great I love it and 48:43 then later 48:45 Ray Charles to then I’m not Eleanor 48:47 Rigby which was loved 48:50 I mean he’s saying you know yeah our 48:53 stuffs being covered and I was lucky 48:56 when I come up with a song yesterday 48:57 because that covered like about three 49:01 thousand times 49:02 I think three thousand people maybe over 49:04 there had recorded that and I was always 49:06 amazed great but I thought who are these 49:11 people 49:11 you know so I said to one of our guys I 49:15 said Johnny can you get me like the top 49:17 ten just give me the sort of top ten 49:20 best ones I just saw a nun listen to a 49:23 mother well they were great it was like 49:25 Frank Sinatra and Elvis Marvin Gaye very 49:31 cool 49:33 Ray Charles and you know the list went 49:35 on and it was amazing people amazing 49:38 versions it’s a funny thing though when 49:40 I 49:41 through it was Frank Elvis and I think 49:45 Marvin who changed the lyrics a little 49:47 bit in the middle I go why she had to go 49:51 I don’t know she wouldn’t say when they 49:54 changed why she had to go I don’t know 49:58 she wouldn’t know why she had to go I 50:00 don’t know she wouldn’t say I did 50:02 something wrong so what I think and they 50:05 go must have done something wrong 50:08 like you know disclaimer I don’t think I 50:12 did 50:13 maybe they say I did I don’t think I did 50:16 I’m Frank Sinatra although I can’t think 50:25 the life of me what he was like stay 50:34 well this is one Phil Christopher maybe 50:40 we’ve cover this a little bit but how

50:42 would you teach an aspiring songwriter 50:44 to write a successful song well that’s 50:47 most first of all then to have write a 50:49 song I don’t know where that as 50:51 accessible yeah I don’t know really I 50:59 don’t know like I say you know I 51:01 actually don’t know how to do it but 51:02 what I’m doing I was now gonna write try 51:04 and write a song you I would first of 51:06 all go somewhere very quiet like a far 51:09 away cupboard or toilet because it’s 51:13 embarrassing writing songs you know you 51:16 don’t want to do it in public because 51:17 you want it you want to make your 51:19 mistakes in private so I would get 51:22 somewhere required and you know probably 51:25 take a guitar and then just start 51:27 googling around on whatever chord you 51:30 fancy that day whatever so I’m coming in 51:33 my mind would be a to the one up from f 51:38 so I be you know I would start with that 51:41 and start just so noodling with it just

51:45 changing and just kind of select a 51:49 rhythm or a temple that feels okay in 51:52 the mood I mean and then I just start 51:54 sort of singing over it and just see 51:57 what comes out and sometimes something 52:00 crazy comes out and but I would kind of 52:04 go with it and just try and follow the 52:06 trail and I think the main thing is to 52:11 stick with it and not just go ah this is 52:13 terrible because often the second verse 52:15 or the chorus can get great and then you 52:19 can sort of go back and fix the 52:20 beginning of it you know so that’s why I 52:23 do I just keep going and then just write 52:28 the words as I go and sometimes the 52:30 second verse is better so I switched 52:33 that to the first verse and just keep 52:37 going till I feel like um and then yeah 52:40 if you’re lucky you get in a kind of 52:42 pocket do you think I can’t join this I 52:45 did it recently even though I’ve 52:47 finished the album and I’m trying not to 52:49 write songs I was going to the gym and 52:53 it was closed I don’t know what I’m 52:56 going to do now to kill and so I picked 53:02 them with guitar just doing ding ding 53:03 ding I thought oh that’s ok I’ll put 53:07 that down my phone no voice no don’t do 53:11 that call 53:12 finish it the other you were going to be 53:17 in the gym forget it 53:19 anyway this one won’t finish it so I sat 53:21 down and started with this little thing 53:23 and instead of putting it down to the 53:25 phone I just pursued it and kept going 53:29 on it and it turned out as a song it’s 53:33 interesting you say that thing about 53:34 having to find somewhere where you’re 53:37 not going to be overheard yeah and that 53:39 must have been difficult I watched I 53:42 guess a lot of people in the audience 53:43 were seeing your appearance on the 53:45 carpool carrier 53:46 you thing recently you seem that you 53:49 haven’t have a watch of it as part of 53:52 that you go back to your old childhood 53:54 home 53:55 yeah and finding a place you know 53:57 private to kind of write songs when 53:59 you’re living in a house of that science

54:01 would be pretty difficult yeah well it 54:03 was the toilet yeah mostly acoustic but 54:06 that we can that can cause problems of 54:07 its own well thank you monopolizes the 54:10 toilet pop shot off yeah it did 54:17 occasionally and then I would have to 54:18 stop let someone go and go back in 54:21 holding my notes but another thing that 54:27 I found interesting that you said whilst 54:29 you were there was was this thing of 54:32 feel in the distance that you travel 54:34 from that place yeah but also how 54:38 formative it was how clear it was in 54:40 your mind as well he’s the founder stand 54:43 corrected that was the first time you’ve 54:44 been back there since you looked back 54:45 yeah it was you know I’d been outside 54:47 cuz ya’ll coughed a little quite a long 54:50 with Lipper and let’s hear Philippa oh 54:56 yeah I can’t often fly up and then I’ll 55:01 get a a car’s health right from the 55:03 airport and I’ll Drive whoever’s with me 55:06 around and you know just take that all 55:09 the routes and so we go through like you 55:12 know speak where I used to live also to

55:15 say oh you know I know I wants to do 55:19 that Church over there for an art 55:21 competition which I actually want I can 55:24 there’s only two people in the 55:26 competition and he won the year before 55:30 I think they let me have it but anyway 55:32 you notice I’m going around and telling 55:33 all these stories and when I get to 55:35 fourth one Road which is my old house 55:38 which is now a national trust thing I 55:41 never go in I would just pull up there 55:52 and you know tell them all the stories 55:54 but I never never really want to go in I 55:56 thinking it might be a bit spooky hmm my 55:59 favorite so strange coming back so I’m 56:03 doing this one time I’m sitting in the 56:06 car I’m showing this friend and this 56:08 older guy walks past me yeah he did live

56:12 there but now with with with James it 56:21 was like he said no we should go in you 56:24 know and I loved it it was great and he 56:29 wasn’t spooky I think it was just it’s 56:32 like this place you know it’s just full 56:34 of memories just everything where I look 56:37 around and I’m playing playing show like 56:39 me on those benches at the back there 56:41 with George and you know they’re coming 56:44 coming here for C in the head most of 56:46 all the teachers walk in with their 56:49 gowns are like Nazi building gowns the 56:53 primary school never had any of that so 56:55 you know just it’s just so many memories 56:58 getting the cane for instance which was 57:02 a wonderful memory I’m now heavily into

57:05 us and him I blame them I was gonna get 57:10 on to that later 57:12 soon as he thrilled to go the grew to 57:15 like it 57:16 no however you used to get the game you 57:20 know and I kids these days you can’t 57:22 really imagine what that was to be like 57:25 but it was that was what happened you 57:28 know if you were cheeky and we were you 57:31 know we’re always just you know 57:32 Liverpool guys anyway you’ve got a 57:34 problem you’re in Liverpool guys and you 57:37 know the kind like me and George and 57:40 those kind of things always so we’re 57:42 always getting in trouble and you would 57:44 get the cake and you would have to hold 57:46 your hand out you go a little office 57:48 down there was there was a Baz’s office 57:50 headmaster and you would that was the 57:53 worst of your cold days and you would 57:55 have to hold your hand and he would give 57:57 you what they called six of the best and 58:00 he would just take this bloody dry thing 58:03 I was long rod and he was just wacky and 58:09 you know you put it put it by God oh you 58:12 just had sex 58:13 you know hence my love of my term one 58:18 time the story goes George was getting 58:22 it we got it quite often I’m afraid to 58:24 say but George got it once and the 58:27 teacher doing it this time missed and 58:31 got him there on the archery in a nice 58:35 dangerous because you know you got 58:37 arteries that I can open them 58:38 that’s like these days you just they the 58:42 teacher be expelled me anything like 58:43 that but those days it didn’t matter 58:46 anyway so George has got this big wheel 58:49 on his wrist here he goes home and he’s 58:53 having tea with the family and his dad 58:56 suddenly notices what’s that 58:57 oh good God came today you know I had to 59:01 admit it 59:03 well the next day in school over there I 59:07 think it was George’s in class and a 59:10 little knock comes on the door and he 59:12 said another teacher he says it to the 59:14 teacher who came George cruciate from UM 59:17 there it goes outside and there’s the

59:20 teacher who came George and the teacher 59:23 who’s showing George’s dad in so 59:26 George’s dad and they said did you came 59:29 my son yesterday yeah well it is a 59:44 barbaric practice in it I mean it’s kind 59:47 of crazy they did exist I simply just 59:50 waved at me and I don’t think they were 59:51 being friendly I think telling me that 59:54 we’ve got five minutes left so early 59:55 I’ve been remiss I haven’t asked you any 59:58 of these Facebook questions that’s – 60:00 yeah let’s do a couple no you go girl 60:03 yeah I think okay so we’ve got a Adina 60:14 or na Okada from Facebook in Japan hello 60:18 Paul 60:19 I just can’t wait to listen to the new

60:21 album in September which songs would you 60:24 think that John would say oh that’s a 60:26 good one from Egypt station and which 60:28 ones would your wife Nancy like most 60:31 lots of love from Nina okay um I think 60:36 John would like a song called I don’t 60:38 know I think he’d like that and I I know 60:44 that Nancy likes a song called 60:46 confidante which I wrote to my guitar 60:52 yeah it sounded strange but it’s a long 60:55 time it’s another of my perversions I 60:58 write two guitars that’s interesting 61:01 because I I was lucky that I was I was 61:03 looking up to see sound check in and and 61:07 you were playing that song and I was 61:08 thinking it was that song – yeah I 61:10 didn’t realize it was to an inanimate 61:11 object 61:13 and people are not unless I explained 61:15 the story people are not gonna cuz it it 61:17 does sound like it like it’s sort of a 61:19 breakup song it’s to someone I don’t 61:21 like but it isn’t it’s it’s a long story 61:25 but so but Nancy like that yeah and 61:30 Danny Costello from Facebook in Buxton 61:33 UK and oh books don’t well you’d 61:36 probably do a water-filled lovely water 61:38 yeah botanist they do yeah it’s so 61:42 lovely oh right yeah well this is again 61:46 about Egypt station I’ve heard that you 61:48 have a painting calling chip station can 61:50 you tell us a bit more about it and why 61:52 you chose it for the title we we have 61:54 kind of covered it let me sort of done 61:56 that well the thing was I like and I’m 62:01 looking at reference books is history 62:04 book for often for like old symbols so 62:10 on the cover of Egypt station there’s an 62:13 onyx so I like that image and I’ll often 62:17 see statues or Aztec that kind of 62:22 civilization and what I think’s amazing 62:26 is some of them look very modern but 62:28 they’re there for a long time so I like 62:32 those and if I like the image I’ll put 62:34 it in the painting and just put other 62:37 things in it this is a guy in there was 62:39 definitely not exactly and I’ll just 62:42 mess it up so it kind of becomes kind of 62:44 like a little surrealist composition and

62:47 so that was that I made that painting 62:50 and I called it a new station it’s like 62:54 you were saying that it seems to be 62:55 something that’s fed into your music a 62:57 lot you were saying about the thing 62:58 about the Beatles sessions ending and 63:00 then you could go out and literally you 63:04 know if I’m correct me if I’m wrong here 63:06 I believe that the the Apple on the 63:09 Apple label comes from and the Greek 63:12 painting that you you won’t yeah oh yeah 63:16 yeah I developed a love for 63:20 when it started I liked it anyway as a 63:23 kid growing up but in 1953 do you 63:28 believe when I was 11 coming to this 63:32 school 63:32 the Queen was crowned the coronation 63:35 year and so they had a competition which 63:40 was an essay competition and you had to 63:43 write about the monarchy so I did and I 63:49 happened to win one of the categories so

63:52 what am i leading with this story 63:54 we’re talking about your love of art 63:56 another what thank you I was off about 64:00 that so so you got a prize for winning 64:09 this competition how did you got one of 64:12 the things you got was a book on the 64:14 monarchy it’s a great PR X and the only 64:18 thing you’re allowed to choose it so I 64:19 choose chosen art book and so that I 64:23 used to just look at that so by the time 64:26 I got some money with the Beatles in the 64:29 early days he liked to sort of look at 64:32 art and stuff and I had this really 64:34 great mate owner of a gallery called 64:37 Robert Fraser and he really knew his art 64:41 you know so I could get advice for him 64:44 and I enjoyed looking at this Rennie 64:48 Magritte Belgian and he he knew his 64:54 dealer so Robert said to me do you want 64:58 to come to Paris and we’ll have dinner 64:59 with the dailies he’s he’s invited us I 65:02 said yeah okay it was funny because 65:04 Robert was gay I had told some of my 65:06 friends you know he’s going to Paris 65:08 with Robert they go are you sure 65:11 they’re not quite secure about my 65:13 sexuality 65:17 overlap with the S&M; I mean there’s 65:20 forgetting there are we know anyone we 65:23 go over we go over and and so we have 65:31 dinner and everything then he Bob the 65:34 gallery so you go downstairs little 65:36 stairs she was like you know someone who 65:43 loves his wife and I could I could now 65:46 afford to buy a couple now I couldn’t I 65:49 mean you know they are like but they 65:52 were like 3,000 pounds and now they’re 65:55 worth a bit more but yeah so so that 65:59 kind of started it but I love about I 66:01 need in over there I saw this Apple and 66:04 what happened one day knowing I love 66:08 this I was out in the background doing a 66:12 little music video with Mary Hopkin

66:14 actually and I’m so I was busy and 66:18 Robert knew I was busy so I came back in 66:20 from the garden and he’d left this 66:23 little painting little oil by Magritte 66:26 propped up on the thing I need split he 66:29 just got so and then what the painting 66:33 was a green apple and written across it 66:35 in 66:36 Magritte’s writing was or that is the 66:41 coolest most conceptual thing anyone’s 66:43 ever done just leave I’m agreed with au 66:46 revoir and you know so yeah that’s where 66:51 it came from so and why was the Apple 66:55 because you know there was an apple 66:56 before you know cause people thinking we 66:59 mean an apple but we mean so and why we 67:05 did it people say why did you do 67:06 something 67:07 it was a is for Apple dude we just like 67:10 that it was near the beginning of the 67:12 alphabet I like L many lists it would 67:18 come Ali we kind of like we like to do 67:21 and then Apple went but Jesus by being a 67:23 B so they came for some Louis I’m not

67:33 gonna get forgiven if I don’t wounded I 67:35 would love to talk to you for the maybe 67:38 until the end of time but I know we have 67:42 to stop them and thanks ever so much for 67:45 submitting tonight questioning it’s good 67:50 for I have to say – ever – everyone 67:52 hanging around the soul because I 67:55 believe something exciting’s gonna

67:57 happen behind that curtain quite soon I 68:00 also know that you’re gonna come and 68:02 play in Liverpool in December zone yeah 68:05 so everybody should prepare themselves 68:07 for that yeah we are playing the Echo 68:11 Arena in in December but the thing is we 68:14 also have tomorrow we have a little 68:16 secret gig somewhat in I’ve got kidding 68:24 you Jarvis what I like to write well I’m 68:27 not quite hangar 68:29 ladies and gentlemen please 68:32 [Applause]

The wisdom of Macca: what Paul McCartney told students at the college he founded

Last updated on September 2, 2018


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