The Paul McCartney Project

"Revolver" Session #1

Apr 06, 1966 • For The Beatles

Album Songs recorded during this session officially appear on the Revolver (UK Mono) Official album.
Timeline See what happened in April 1966
Studio:
EMI Studios, Studio Three, Abbey Road

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Songs recorded


1.

Tomorrow Never Knows

Written by Lennon - McCartney

Recording • Take 1

Album Officially appears on Anthology 2


2.

Tomorrow Never Knows

Written by Lennon - McCartney

Recording • Take 2


3.

Tomorrow Never Knows

Written by Lennon - McCartney

Recording • Take 3

The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions • Mark Lewisohn

The definitive guide for every Beatles recording sessions from 1962 to 1970.

We owe a lot to Mark Lewisohn for the creation of those session pages, but you really have to buy this book to get all the details - the number of takes for each song, who contributed what, a description of the context and how each session went, various photographies... And an introductory interview with Paul McCartney!

Staff

Production staff

George Martin:
Producer
Geoff Emerick:
Engineer
Phil McDonald:
Second Engineer

About

From Anthology 2 liner notes:

The Beatles had worked almost every day for five years when, after issuing the single Day Tripper/We Can Work It Out, the album Rubber Soul and touring Britain for what turned out to be the last time, they demanded a break from this punishing schedule, taking off the first three months of 1966. Clearly refreshed, and full of yet more innovative ideas, they convened at EMI Studios on 6 April and began work on their seventh album, Revolver, with what turned out to be its closing and most progressive number, Tomorrow Never Knows.

Here was Beatles music the like of which had never before been heard … or made. Here was a dramatic new direction for a musical form that was ceasing to be “pop” and developing into “rock”. Here was a thrilling orgy of sound, all the more inventive for being made within the confines of 1966 four-track technology, less reliant on melody but focusing more on the conveyance of mind-picture on to tape. Tomorrow Never Knows is all of this in a piece of music, the released version (Take 3) being as stunning now as it was 30 years ago. Recorded under its working title Mark I, Take 1, issued [on Anthology 2] for the first time, is notably different but, in its own way, just as compelling.

The Beatles’ music had indeed come a long way in the four years since Love Me Do.

Last updated on May 26, 2016


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